As you can see, you have a lot of good choices if you want to compare Medicare Advantage plans in Minnesota for 2019. Calling all of these companies can be difficult and can take forever, but you don’t have to do that to find pricing information. Instead, you can pull it all up with our quote request form, making a comparison easier than it might have ever been before.

Of the Medicare beneficiaries who are not dual eligible for both Medicare (around 10% are fully dual eligible) and Medicaid or that do not receive group retirement insurance via a former employer (about 30%) or do not choose a public Part C Medicare health plan (about 35%) or who are not otherwise insured (about 5% -- e.g., still working and receiving employer insurance, on VA, etc.), almost all the remaining elect to purchase a type of private supplemental indemnity insurance policy called a Medigap plan (about 20%), to help fill in the financial holes in Original Medicare (Part A and B) in addition to public Part D. Note that the percentages add up to over 100% because many beneficiaries have more than one type of additional protection on top of Original Medicare.
More limited income-relation of premiums only raises limited revenue. Currently, only 5 percent of Medicare enrollees pay an income-related premium, and most only pay 35 percent of their total premium, compared to the 25 percent most people pay. Only a negligible number of enrollees fall into the higher income brackets required to bear a more substantial share of their costs—roughly half a percent of individuals and less than three percent of married couples currently pay more than 35 percent of their total Part B costs.[149]

Robert M. Ball, a former commissioner of Social Security under President Kennedy in 1961 (and later under Johnson, and Nixon) defined the major obstacle to financing health insurance for the elderly: the high cost of care for the aged combined with the generally low incomes of retired people. Because retired older people use much more medical care than younger employed people, an insurance premium related to the risk for older people needed to be high, but if the high premium had to be paid after retirement, when incomes are low, it was an almost impossible burden for the average person. The only feasible approach, he said, was to finance health insurance in the same way as cash benefits for retirement, by contributions paid while at work, when the payments are least burdensome, with the protection furnished in retirement without further payment.[97] In the early 1960s relatively few of the elderly had health insurance, and what they had was usually inadequate. Insurers such as Blue Cross, which had originally applied the principle of community rating, faced competition from other commercial insurers that did not community rate, and so were forced to raise their rates for the elderly.[98]


No part of Medicare pays for all of a beneficiary's covered medical costs and many costs and services are not covered at all. The program contains premiums, deductibles and coinsurance, which the covered individual must pay out-of-pocket. A study published by the Kaiser Family Foundation in 2008 found the Fee-for-Service Medicare benefit package was less generous than either the typical large employer preferred provider organization plan or the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Standard Option.[49] Some people may qualify to have other governmental programs (such as Medicaid) pay premiums and some or all of the costs associated with Medicare.

Medicare.gov provides tools that will allow you to compare plans, but the decision is complicated. Insurance agent Graves recommends that you “work with a licensed insurance agent who can show you both Medicare Supplement Plans and Advantage Plans from multiple companies. Each type has its positives.” The questions to cover, he says: “You need to understand the costs, doctor networks, coverage levels, and maximum out-of-pocket for each. Enroll in what suits your situation best.” Organizations such as Consumer Reports and the Medicare Rights Center can also help you research your decision.
The standardized Medigap plans each cover certain Medicare out-of-pocket costs to at least some degree. Every Medigap plan covers up to one year of Medicare Part A coinsurance and hospital costs after Medicare benefits are used up. But, for example, Medigap Plan G plans don’t cover your Medicare Part B deductible, while Medigap Plan C plans do. So, if you’d like to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan, you might want to compare the Medigap policies carefully.
This measure involves only Part A. The trust fund is considered insolvent when available revenue plus any existing balances will not cover 100 percent of annual projected costs. According to the latest estimate by the Medicare trustees (2018), the trust fund is expected to become insolvent in 8 years (2026), at which time available revenue will cover around 85 percent of annual projected costs for Part A services.[88] Since Medicare began, this solvency projection has ranged from two to 28 years, with an average of 11.3 years.[89] This and other projections in Medicare Trustees reports are based on what its actuaries call intermediate scenario but the reports also include worst-case and best case scenarios that are quite different (other scenarios presume Congress will change present law).
Basic Plan with Copay Basic Plan with Copay covers the same benefits as Basic Plan for Medicare Part A. For Medicare Part B medical expenses, the plan pays generally 20%, other than up to $20 per office visit and up to $50 per emergency room visit. The copayment of up to $50 is waived if you are admitted to any hospital and the emergency visit is covered as a Medicare Part A expense. This plan also covers the Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare.
Most agents will know what you mean when you ask about Part F, but here’s an easier way to remember the right words. Just remind yourself that Medicare itself has Parts,  and there are only 4 of those Parts – A, B, C, and D. There’s no such thing as Part F! Many online articles will use the wrong term on purpose, because they know that consumers like you are sometimes search on the wrong term. All Supplement insurances are called Plans.   So instead of calling it Medicare Part F or Part F Coverage say Medigap Plan F. Then you’ll be right on track.
Most Medicare enrollees do not pay a monthly Part A premium, because they (or a spouse) have had 40 or more 3-month quarters in which they paid Federal Insurance Contributions Act taxes. The benefit is the same no matter how much or how little the beneficiary paid as long as the minimum number of quarters is reached. Medicare-eligible persons who do not have 40 or more quarters of Medicare-covered employment may buy into Part A for an annual adjusted monthly premium of:
The 10 different Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plans available in most states have standardized benefits across each plan letter. For example, Medigap Plan A will have the same benefits regardless of which state you live in or which insurance company you buy from. If you live in Massachusetts, Minnesota, or Wisconsin, the Medigap plans in these states are standardized differently.

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Medicare Part B premiums are commonly deducted automatically from beneficiaries' monthly Social Security checks. They can also be paid quarterly via bill sent directly to beneficiaries. This alternative is becoming more common because whereas the eligibility age for Medicare has remained at 65 per the 1965 legislation, the so-called Full Retirement Age for Social Security has been increased to 66 and will go even higher over time. Therefore, many people delay collecting Social Security but join Medicare at 65 and have to pay their Part B premium directly.
Basic Plan helps cover Medicare's Parts A and B coinsurance, hospice care coinsurance or copayment, skilled nursing facility care coinsurance, the first 3 pints of blood each year, and Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare. Basic Plan with Copay covers the same benefits as Basic Plan for Medicare Part A. For Medicare Part B medical expenses, the plan pays generally 20%, other than up to $20 per office visit and up to $50 per emergency room visit. The copayment of up to $50 is waived if you are admitted to any hospital and the emergency visit is covered as a Medicare Part A expense. This plan also covers the Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare.
Do you have fairly frequent doctor or hospital visits? If so, you may already know that Medicare Part A and Part B come with out-of-pocket costs you have to pay. You might be able to save money with a Medicare Supplement insurance plan. Medicare Supplement, or Medigap, insurance plans fill in “gaps” in basic benefits left behind by Original Medicare, Part A and Part B, such as deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.
Generally, if you already receive Social Security payments, at age 65 you are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance). If you choose not to accept Part B (typically because you are still working and receiving employer insurance), you must proactively opt out of it when you receive your automatic enrollment package. You may delay Part B enrollment with no penalty under some circumstances (e.g. the employment situation noted above), or with penalty under other circumstances. If you do not receive SS when you turn 65 you must proactively join Medicare if you want it (and the penalties may apply if you choose not to based on various factors).
The Minnesota Department of Commerce: provides beneficiaries with information about Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans and other insurance options available to them. The office is a resource for information about protection from Medicare fraud and how to report fraud. Additional links are included for federal offices that deal with Medicare and brochures that explain how to enroll in Part D Prescription Drug Plans. This government office also offers downloads of premium guides for supplemental plans available to current Medicare beneficiaries in Minnesota.
Helpfulness: You can search the site for the closest available agent for a face-to-face talk, or fill out a quick online form stating specific times you’re available for a customer service representative to call you – as well as include any notes to explain your needs. The site also features an education section titled “Planning and Advice” which is essentially a Medicare 101 info center to turn you into a Medicare pro. The section includes helpful articles touching on topics including your enrollment period and eligibility rules. That way you can read up on an arsenal of info before you reach out to a representative so you have a better handle on what to ask and what you’re looking for.

A number of different plans have been introduced that would raise the age of Medicare eligibility.[126][127][128][129] Some have argued that, as the population ages and the ratio of workers to retirees increases, programs for the elderly need to be reduced. Since the age at which Americans can retire with full Social Security benefits is rising to 67, it is argued that the age of eligibility for Medicare should rise with it (though people can begin receiving reduced Social Security benefits as early as age 62).
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Medicare Advantage Plans must cover all of the services that Original Medicare covers except hospice care. Original Medicare covers hospice care even if you’re in a Medicare Advantage Plan. In all types of Medicare Advantage Plans, you’re always covered for emergency and urgent care. Medicare Advantage Plans must offer emergency coverage outside of the plan’s service area (but not outside the U.S.). Many Medicare Advantage Plans also offer extra benefits such as dental care, eyeglasses, or wellness programs. Most Medicare Advantage Plans include Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D). In addition to your Part B premium, you usually pay one monthly premium for the plan’s medical and prescription drug coverage. Plan benefits can change from year to year. Make sure you understand how a plan works before you join.
For institutional care, such as hospital and nursing home care, Medicare uses prospective payment systems. In a prospective payment system, the health care institution receives a set amount of money for each episode of care provided to a patient, regardless of the actual amount of care. The actual allotment of funds is based on a list of diagnosis-related groups (DRG). The actual amount depends on the primary diagnosis that is actually made at the hospital. There are some issues surrounding Medicare's use of DRGs because if the patient uses less care, the hospital gets to keep the remainder. This, in theory, should balance the costs for the hospital. However, if the patient uses more care, then the hospital has to cover its own losses. This results in the issue of "upcoding," when a physician makes a more severe diagnosis to hedge against accidental costs.[55]
Per capita spending relative to inflation per-capita GDP growth was to be an important factor used by the PPACA-specified Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), as a measure to determine whether it must recommend to Congress proposals to reduce Medicare costs. However the IPAB never formed and was formerly repealed by the Balanced Budget Act of 2018.
Do you have fairly frequent doctor or hospital visits? If so, you may already know that Medicare Part A and Part B come with out-of-pocket costs you have to pay. You might be able to save money with a Medicare Supplement insurance plan. Medicare Supplement, or Medigap, insurance plans fill in “gaps” in basic benefits left behind by Original Medicare, Part A and Part B, such as deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.
Because of how Part D works and depending on income, a patient could pay between 35 percent and 85 percent of the cost of some of their prescription drugs if they need enough medication to push them into the notorious doughnut hole, when Part D's full prescription-drug coverage runs out after a person has spent $3,750, until their medication costs exceed $5,000 per year. (In 2019, coverage will end at $3,750 and begin again at $5,000.) During the coverage gap, the patient would be responsible for 25 percent of covered, brand-name prescription drugs.
In general, all persons 65 years of age or older who have been legal residents of the United States for at least five years are eligible for Medicare. People with disabilities under 65 may also be eligible if they receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Specific medical conditions may also help people become eligible to enroll in Medicare.
A Medigap policy (also called Medicare Supplement Insurance) is private health insurance that’s designed to supplement Original Medicare. This means it helps pay some of the health care costs that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like copayments, coinsurance and deductibles. If you have Original Medicare and a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amounts for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
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Each Medicare Supplement insurance plan offers a different level of basic benefits, but each lettered plan must include the same standardized basic benefits regardless of insurance company and location. For example, Medicare Supplement Plan G in Florida includes the same basic benefits as Plan G in North Dakota. Please note that if you live in Massachusetts, Minnesota, or Wisconsin, your Medicare Supplement insurance plan options are different than in the rest of the country. Medicare Supplement insurance plans do not have to cover vision, dental, long-term care, or hearing aids, but all plans must cover at least a portion of the following basic benefits:
Price Transparency: You can find out if Blue Cross Blue Shield offers Medicare supplement insurance your state and zip code with a simple online search through their website. If one of their affiliated companies (like Anthem) offers coverage in your area, your search will denote that. Prices aren’t readily available, however, especially when compared with other company’s websites. You’ll need to call for a quote

Roughly nine million Americans—mostly older adults with low incomes—are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. These men and women tend to have particularly poor health – more than half are being treated for five or more chronic conditions[136]—and high costs. Average annual per-capita spending for "dual-eligibles" is $20,000,[137] compared to $10,900 for the Medicare population as a whole all enrollees.[138]
1 Actual benefits and rates vary by state. The supplemental benefits referenced are taken from PPO Dental Policy Form CH-26121-IP (01/12), Premiere Vision Policy Form CH-26120-IP (01/12), Fixed Indemnity Direct Policy Form CH-26126-IP (10/13), or their state variations which are underwritten by The Chesapeake Life Insurance Company. Administrative offices located in North Richland Hills, TX. Product availability varies by state. A complete list of benefits, exclusions and limitations is available upon request. Please contact a licensed agent and refer to the Policy. | 2 http://www.ct.gov/cid/lib/cid/Medicare_Supplement_Insurance_Rates.pdf | 3 https://medicare.com/medicare-supplement/how-much-will-your-medigap-policy-cost/
Beneficiaries may enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan in California during their six-month Medigap Open Enrollment Period, beginning on the first day of the month that they are 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B. During this time, beneficiaries aren’t subject to medical underwriting, which means they cannot be charged higher premiums or denied coverage based solely on medical history or a current medical condition. However, if a beneficiary adds or changes a Medicare Supplement insurance plan at any other time, medical underwriting guidelines will generally apply.
Of the more than 300,000 people losing their Cost plans in Minnesota, it’s likely that roughly 100,000 people will be automatically enrolled into a comparable plan with their current insurer, Corson said, unless they make another selection. Details haven’t been finalized, he said. That likely will leave another 200,000 people, he said, who will need to be proactive to obtain new replacement Medicare coverage.
How much do you know about Medicare supplement insurance? Contrary to common belief, Medicare, the government-funded healthcare insurance for American citizens age 65 and up, doesn’t cover 100% of your medical costs. Medicare supplement insurance plans add additional coverage to fill the gap in coverage between Medicare and your actual medical expenses. Private companies sell these so-called “Medigap” policies, which are typically used to cover expenses like deductibles and co-pays.
In 2018, Medicare provided health insurance for over 59.9 million individuals—more than 52 million people aged 65 and older and about 8 million younger people.[1] On average, Medicare covers about half of healthcare expenses of those enrolled. Despite often being called single-payer, United States Medicare is funded by a combination of a payroll tax, beneficiary premiums and surtaxes from beneficiaries, co-pays and deductibles, and general U.S. Treasury revenue. In addition, per the Medicare Trustees, almost everyone on Medicare adds private or public supplements to so-called Original Medicare, which have additional premiums and co-pays. Instead of being single payer, some people on United States Medicare have as many as six payers including themselves.
Medicare is a national health insurance program in the United States, begun in 1966 under the Social Security Administration (SSA) and now administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). It provides health insurance for Americans aged 65 and older, younger people with some disability status as determined by the Social Security Administration, as well as people with end stage renal disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease).
Another wrinkle is that people who want a supplement might have a better chance of getting into the coverage during the transition out of their Medicare Cost plan, when the supplement is provided on a “guaranteed issue” basis. Later, insurance companies can ask questions about a senior’s health status and deny coverage depending on the answers, said Greiner of the Minnesota Board on Aging.
Buying a policy can be complicated, so get help and find a helpful policy provider. There are many coverage choices available, and the right plan may help you significantly reduce unwanted medical costs. Before you sign up, it’s a good idea to have a friend or family member review your policy. If that’s not an option, we found the following companies were the best and therefore should be a good choice.
Basic Plan with Copay Basic Plan with Copay covers the same benefits as Basic Plan for Medicare Part A. For Medicare Part B medical expenses, the plan pays generally 20%, other than up to $20 per office visit and up to $50 per emergency room visit. The copayment of up to $50 is waived if you are admitted to any hospital and the emergency visit is covered as a Medicare Part A expense. This plan also covers the Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare.
A Medicare Advantage plan (like an HMO or PPO) is another Medicare health plan choice you may have as part of Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private companies approved by Medicare. If you join a Medicare Advantage plan, you still have Medicare. You will get your Part A (hospital insurance) and Part B (medical insurance) coverage from the Medicare Advantage plan and no Original Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans must cover all of the services that Original Medicare covers except hospice care. Original Medicare covers hospice care even if you’re in a Medicare Advantage plan. Medicare Advantage plans aren’t supplemental coverage. Medicare Advantage plans may offer extra coverage, such as vision, hearing, dental, and/or health and wellness programs. Most include Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D). In most cases, you can join a Medicare Advantage plan only at certain times during the year.
The SGR was the subject of possible reform legislation again in 2014. On March 14, 2014, the United States House of Representatives passed the SGR Repeal and Medicare Provider Payment Modernization Act of 2014 (H.R. 4015; 113th Congress), a bill that would have replaced the (SGR) formula with new systems for establishing those payment rates.[59] However, the bill would pay for these changes by delaying the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate requirement, a proposal that was very unpopular with Democrats.[60] The SGR was expected to cause Medicare reimbursement cuts of 24 percent on April 1, 2014, if a solution to reform or delay the SGR was not found.[61] This led to another bill, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (H.R. 4302; 113th Congress), which would delay those cuts until March 2015.[61] This bill was also controversial. The American Medical Association and other medical groups opposed it, asking Congress to provide a permanent solution instead of just another delay.[62]
Medicare Part D went into effect on January 1, 2006. Anyone with Part A or B is eligible for Part D, which covers mostly self-administered drugs. It was made possible by the passage of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. To receive this benefit, a person with Medicare must enroll in a stand-alone Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) or public Part C healh plan with integrated prescription drug coverage (MA-PD). These plans are approved and regulated by the Medicare program, but are actually designed and administered by various sponsors including charities, integrated health delivery systems, unions and health insurance companies; almost all these sponsors in turn use pharmacy benefit managers in the same way as they are used by sponsors of health insurance for those not on Medicare. Unlike Original Medicare (Part A and B), Part D coverage is not standardized (though it is highly regulated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services). Plans choose which drugs they wish to cover (but must cover at least two drugs in 148 different categories and cover all or "substantially all" drugs in the following protected classes of drugs: anti-cancer; anti-psychotic; anti-convulsant, anti-depressants, immuno-suppressant, and HIV and AIDS drugs). The plans can also specify with CMS approval at what level (or tier) they wish to cover it, and are encouraged to use step therapy. Some drugs are excluded from coverage altogether and Part D plans that cover excluded drugs are not allowed to pass those costs on to Medicare, and plans are required to repay CMS if they are found to have billed Medicare in these cases.[48]
Several measures serve as indicators of the long-term financial status of Medicare. These include total Medicare spending as a share of gross domestic product (GDP), the solvency of the Medicare HI trust fund, Medicare per-capita spending growth relative to inflation and per-capita GDP growth; general fund revenue as a share of total Medicare spending; and actuarial estimates of unfunded liability over the 75-year timeframe and the infinite horizon (netting expected premium/tax revenue against expected costs). The major issue in all these indicators is comparing any future projections against current law vs. what the actuaries expect to happen. For example, current law specifies that Part A payments to hospitals and skilled nursing facilities will be cut substantially after 2028 and that doctors will get no raises after 2025. The actuaries expect that the law will change to keep these events from happening.
If you are a Minnesota beneficiary and considering enrollment in a Medicare Advantage plan, it is important to compare and evaluate the Medicare plan options available to you. While similar Medicare Advantage plans may be offered throughout the state, the cost for premiums may vary depending on your county of residence. You should also take note that some Medicare Advantage plans in Minnesota may offer monthly premiums as low as $0. If your service area offers a Medicare Advantage plan with a $0 premium, keep in mind that the plan may still include other costs besides the premium, such as copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles. In addition, you must still pay your Medicare Part B premium.

Since the mid-1990s, there have been a number of proposals to change Medicare from a publicly run social insurance program with a defined benefit, for which there is no limit to the government's expenses, into a publicly run health plan program that offers "premium support" for enrollees.[119][120] The basic concept behind the proposals is that the government would make a defined contribution, that is a premium support, to the health plan of a Medicare enrollee's choice. Sponsors would compete to provide Medicare benefits and this competition would set the level of fixed contribution. Additionally, enrollees would be able to purchase greater coverage by paying more in addition to the fixed government contribution. Conversely, enrollees could choose lower cost coverage and keep the difference between their coverage costs and the fixed government contribution.[121][122] The goal of premium Medicare plans is for greater cost-effectiveness; if such a proposal worked as planned, the financial incentive would be greatest for Medicare plans that offer the best care at the lowest cost.[119][122]


In 47 states, there are 10 standardized Medicare Supplement insurance plans that are denoted by the letters A through N (plans E, H, I, and J are no longer sold). The private insurance companies offering these plans do not have to offer every Medicare Supplement plan, but they must offer at least Plan A. If an insurance company chooses to offer any Medicare Supplement insurance plans in addition to Plan A, it must offer either Plan C or Plan F along with any other standardized Medicare Supplement insurance plans it offers.
If you decide to sign up for a Medicare Advantage plan, you may want to shop around, because costs and coverage details are likely to vary. Our obligation-free eHealthMedicare plan finder tool on this page lets you see all available Medicare Advantage options in your area, including a list of coverage details once you click on the plan of interest.
If you're enrolled in Medicare Parts A and Part B, Medicare supplement insurance (Medigap) may help cover some out-of-pocket costs not covered by Parts A and B, such as certain copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles. You can apply for Medicare supplement insurance at any time** and there are various standardized plans available. If you have questions, just call UnitedHealthcare at 1-844-775-1729 1-844-775-1729 (TTY 711). We're here to help.
Special Needs Plans (SNP): Special Needs Plans are for beneficiaries with certain unique situations and meet certain eligibility criteria. These plans may limit membership to people who have certain chronic conditions, live in an institution (such as a nursing home), or are dual eligibles (receive both Medicare and Medicaid benefits). You must meet the eligibility requirements of the Special Needs Plan to enroll; for example, to enroll in a Dual-Eligible Special Needs Plan in your service area, you must have both Medicare and Medicaid coverage.
Buying a policy can be complicated, so get help and find a helpful policy provider. There are many coverage choices available, and the right plan may help you significantly reduce unwanted medical costs. Before you sign up, it’s a good idea to have a friend or family member review your policy. If that’s not an option, we found the following companies were the best and therefore should be a good choice.
More than likely you are going to end up with an HMO type of plan, even if you opt for a Medicare Part C plan that requires you to pay a premium. HMO’s are different from PPO’s, so you’ll need to pay attention. HMO’s require you to stay within network from almost all of you Medical needs.  You’ll also need to get a referral from you Primary Care doctor when seeing a specialist most of the time.  Therefore, you’re going to want to choose a well-known company that has an excellent Medicare Advantage plan network for you to choose from.
Helpfulness: You can search the site for the closest available agent for a face-to-face talk, or fill out a quick online form stating specific times you’re available for a customer service representative to call you – as well as include any notes to explain your needs. The site also features an education section titled “Planning and Advice” which is essentially a Medicare 101 info center to turn you into a Medicare pro. The section includes helpful articles touching on topics including your enrollment period and eligibility rules. That way you can read up on an arsenal of info before you reach out to a representative so you have a better handle on what to ask and what you’re looking for.
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