If you're enrolled in Medicare Parts A and Part B, Medicare supplement insurance (Medigap) may help cover some out-of-pocket costs not covered by Parts A and B, such as certain copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles. You can apply for Medicare supplement insurance at any time** and there are various standardized plans available. If you have questions, just call UnitedHealthcare at 1-844-775-1729 1-844-775-1729 (TTY 711). We're here to help.
Original "fee-for-service" Medicare Parts A and B have a standard benefit package that covers medically necessary care as described in the sections above that members can receive from nearly any hospital or doctor in the country (if that doctor or hospital accepts Medicare). Original Medicare beneficiaries who choose to enroll in a Part C Medicare Advantage or other Part C health plan instead give up none of their rights as an Original Medicare beneficiary, receive the same standard benefits—as a minimum—as provided in Original Medicare, and get an annual out of pocket (OOP) upper spending limit not included in Original Medicare. However they must typically use only a select network of providers except in emergencies or for urgent care while travelling, typically restricted to the area surrounding their legal residence (which can vary from tens to over 100 miles depending on county). Most Part C plans are traditional health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that require the patient to have a primary care physician, though others are preferred provider organizations (which typically means the provider restrictions are not as confining as with an HMO). Others are hybrids of HMO and PPO called HMO-POS (for point of service) and a few public Part C health plans are actually fee for service hybrids.

Medigap plans may cover costs like Medicare coinsurance and copayments, deductibles, and emergency medical care while traveling outside of the United States. There are 10 standardized plan types in 47 states, each given a lettered designation (Plan G, for example). Plans of the same letter offer the same benefits regardless of where you purchase your plan. Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Wisconsin offer their own standardized Medigap plans.
Beneficiaries may enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan in California during their six-month Medigap Open Enrollment Period, beginning on the first day of the month that they are 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B. During this time, beneficiaries aren’t subject to medical underwriting, which means they cannot be charged higher premiums or denied coverage based solely on medical history or a current medical condition. However, if a beneficiary adds or changes a Medicare Supplement insurance plan at any other time, medical underwriting guidelines will generally apply.
The Minnesota Department of Health offers information about Medicare plans in Minnesota. The agency serves as a resource for those who need help paying their Medicare premiums and those interested in obtaining prescription drug coverage. The office also offers guidelines for handling complaints about health-care coverage and providers. Information on other types of health-care coverage are also covered by this website, including long-term care insurance. Downloads of publications on specific topics are also available, as well as links to additional resources available through state and federal offices. 

A federal law passed in 2003 created a “competition” requirement for Medicare Cost plans, which stipulated the plans could not be offered in service areas where there was significant competition from Medicare Advantage plans. Congress delayed implementation of the requirement several times until a law passed in 2015 that called for the rule to take effect in 2019.
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