We make every effort to show all available Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plans in your service area. However, since our data is provided by Medicare, it is possible that this may not be a complete listing of plans available in your service area. For a complete listing please contact 1-800-MEDICARE (TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048), 24 hours a day/7 days a week or consult www.medicare.gov.
Medicare.gov provides tools that will allow you to compare plans, but the decision is complicated. Insurance agent Graves recommends that you “work with a licensed insurance agent who can show you both Medicare Supplement Plans and Advantage Plans from multiple companies. Each type has its positives.” The questions to cover, he says: “You need to understand the costs, doctor networks, coverage levels, and maximum out-of-pocket for each. Enroll in what suits your situation best.” Organizations such as Consumer Reports and the Medicare Rights Center can also help you research your decision.

This website and its contents are for informational purposes only. Nothing on the website should ever be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult with your medical provider regarding diagnosis or treatment for a health condition, including decisions about the correct medication for your condition, as well as prior to undertaking any specific exercise or dietary routine.


Keep in mind that Medigap plans don’t include prescription drug coverage (Part D), so if you want help with your medication costs, you’ll need to enroll in a stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug Plan. In addition, you can’t use your Medicare Supplement plan to pay for costs you may have with a Medicare Advantage plan. Medigap insurance can only be used to cover costs in Original Medicare.
In most states, Medigap insurance plans have the same standardized benefits for each letter category. This means that the basic benefits for a Plan A, for example, is the same across every insurance company that sells Plan A, regardless of location. This makes it easy to compare Medicare Supplement insurance plans because the main difference between plans of the same letter category will be the premium cost.
In 2002, payment rates were cut by 4.8%. In 2003, payment rates were scheduled to be reduced by 4.4%. However, Congress boosted the cumulative SGR target in the Consolidated Appropriation Resolution of 2003 (P.L. 108-7), allowing payments for physician services to rise 1.6%. In 2004 and 2005, payment rates were again scheduled to be reduced. The Medicare Modernization Act (P.L. 108-173) increased payments 1.5% for those two years.
Medicare Part B premiums are commonly deducted automatically from beneficiaries' monthly Social Security checks. They can also be paid quarterly via bill sent directly to beneficiaries. This alternative is becoming more common because whereas the eligibility age for Medicare has remained at 65 per the 1965 legislation, the so-called Full Retirement Age for Social Security has been increased to 66 and will go even higher over time. Therefore, many people delay collecting Social Security but join Medicare at 65 and have to pay their Part B premium directly.
"If you are looking for quality therapy by clinicians who treat you as a whole, unique person (body, mind, and spirit), Wisdom Path is a good fit for you. Everyone is exposed to multiple stresses, and we struggle with the demands of a fast-paced society. Often, we develop unhealthy ways of compulsively numbing ourselves though work, food, sex, gambling, shopping, substances, or social media. At Wisdom Path, we facilitate you becoming fully present in your life, creating meaning, and developing intimate connections with others. We don't just treat mental health issues; we promote wellness and growth."
Part A covers inpatient hospital stays where the beneficiary has been formally admitted to the hospital, including semi-private room, food, and tests. As of January 1, 2018, Medicare Part A had an inpatient hospital deductible of $1340, coinsurance per day as $335 after 61 days confinement within one "spell of illness", coinsurance for "lifetime reserve days" (essentially, days 91-150 of one or more stay of more than 60 days) of $670 per day. The structure of coinsurance in a Skilled Nursing Facility (following a medically necessary hospital confinement of 3 nights in row or more) is different: zero for days 1-20; $167.50 per day for days 21-100. Many medical services provided under Part A (e.g., some surgery in an acute care hospital, some physical therapy in a skilled nursing facility) is covered under Part B. These coverage amounts increase or decrease yearly on 1st day of the year.
Helpfulness: You can search the site for the closest available agent for a face-to-face talk, or fill out a quick online form stating specific times you’re available for a customer service representative to call you – as well as include any notes to explain your needs. The site also features an education section titled “Planning and Advice” which is essentially a Medicare 101 info center to turn you into a Medicare pro. The section includes helpful articles touching on topics including your enrollment period and eligibility rules. That way you can read up on an arsenal of info before you reach out to a representative so you have a better handle on what to ask and what you’re looking for.
If you're enrolled in Medicare Parts A and Part B, Medicare supplement insurance (Medigap) may help cover some out-of-pocket costs not covered by Parts A and B, such as certain copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles. You can apply for Medicare supplement insurance at any time** and there are various standardized plans available. If you have questions, just call UnitedHealthcare at 1-844-775-1729 1-844-775-1729 (TTY 711). We're here to help.
**NY: In New York, the Excess Charge is limited to 5%; PA and OH: Under Pennsylvania and Ohio law, a physician may not charge or collect fees from Medicare patients which exceed the Medicare-approved Part B charge. Plans F and G pay benefits for excess charges when services are rendered in a jurisdiction not having a balance billing law; TX: In Texas, the amount cannot exceed 15% over the Medicare approved amount or any other charge limitation established by the Medicare program or state law. Note that the limiting charge applies only to certain services and does not apply to some supplies and durable medical equipment; VT: Vermont law generally prohibits a physician from charging more than the Medicare approved amount. However, there are exceptions and this prohibition may not apply if you receive services out of state.
While the majority of providers accept Medicare assignments, (97 percent for some specialties),[64] and most physicians still accept at least some new Medicare patients, that number is in decline.[65] While 80% of physicians in the Texas Medical Association accepted new Medicare patients in 2000, only 60% were doing so by 2012.[66] A study published in 2012 concluded that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) relies on the recommendations of an American Medical Association advisory panel. The study led by Dr. Miriam J. Laugesen, of Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues at UCLA and the University of Illinois, shows that for services provided between 1994 and 2010, CMS agreed with 87.4% of the recommendations of the committee, known as RUC or the Relative Value Update Committee.[67]

Medicare beneficiaries in Michigan who are enrolled in Original Medicare (Part A and B) may find that these plans do not cover all of their health expenses. However, Medicare beneficiaries in Michigan may opt to enroll in a Medicare Supplement plan, also known as Medigap, which may cover expenses such as copayments, deductibles, coinsurance, and possibly other out-of-pocket expenses. Most states offer ten standard Medigap policy options.
A number of different plans have been introduced that would raise the age of Medicare eligibility.[126][127][128][129] Some have argued that, as the population ages and the ratio of workers to retirees increases, programs for the elderly need to be reduced. Since the age at which Americans can retire with full Social Security benefits is rising to 67, it is argued that the age of eligibility for Medicare should rise with it (though people can begin receiving reduced Social Security benefits as early as age 62).

When you apply for Medicare, you can sign up for Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medical Insurance). Because you must pay a premium for Part B coverage, you can turn it down. However, if you decide to enroll in Part B later on, you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage. Your monthly premium will go up 10 percent for each 12-month period you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t sign up for it, unless you qualify for a special enrollment period.

Roughly nine million Americans—mostly older adults with low incomes—are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. These men and women tend to have particularly poor health – more than half are being treated for five or more chronic conditions[136]—and high costs. Average annual per-capita spending for "dual-eligibles" is $20,000,[137] compared to $10,900 for the Medicare population as a whole all enrollees.[138]
Keep in mind that Medigap plans don’t include prescription drug coverage (Part D), so if you want help with your medication costs, you’ll need to enroll in a stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug Plan. In addition, you can’t use your Medicare Supplement plan to pay for costs you may have with a Medicare Advantage plan. Medigap insurance can only be used to cover costs in Original Medicare.

Under federal law, insurers cannot deny you Medigap insurance when you initially enroll in Medicare at age 65, and they must renew your coverage annually as long as you pay your premiums. But if you try to buy Medigap insurance outside of that initial enrollment period, insurers in many states can deny coverage or charge you higher premiums based on your health or pre-existing conditions.
Basic Plan helps cover Medicare's Parts A and B coinsurance, hospice care coinsurance or copayment, skilled nursing facility care coinsurance, the first 3 pints of blood each year, and Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare. Basic Plan with Copay covers the same benefits as Basic Plan for Medicare Part A. For Medicare Part B medical expenses, the plan pays generally 20%, other than up to $20 per office visit and up to $50 per emergency room visit. The copayment of up to $50 is waived if you are admitted to any hospital and the emergency visit is covered as a Medicare Part A expense. This plan also covers the Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare.
"Welcome. You might be looking for a guide through troubled waters for yourself or someone you care about. I enjoy working with people who desire to live authentic lives and grow to their full potential. I can improve understanding of your symptoms, but each of us are unique individuals with differences in responses, I treat people, not diagnosis. I enjoy working with professionals and couples. I see everyone as a work in progress. I consider therapy a journey we take together that is rich in meaning and fulfillment. We are body, mind and spirit and I use a wholeness approach." 
×