Medicare overview information on this website was developed by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association to help consumers understand certain aspects about Medicare. Viewing this Medicare overview does not require you to enroll in any Blue Cross Blue Shield plans. To find out about premiums and terms for these and other insurance options, how to apply for coverage, and for much more information, contact your local Blue Cross Blue Shield company. Each Blue Cross Blue Shield company is responsible for the information that it provides. For more information about Medicare including a complete listing of plans available in your service area, please contact the Medicare program at 1-800-MEDICARE (TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048) or visit www.medicare.gov.

Public Part C Medicare Advantage and other Part C health plans are required to offer coverage that meets or exceeds the standards set by Original Medicare but they do not have to cover every benefit in the same way (the plan must be actuarially equivalent to Original Medicare benefits). After approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, if a Part C plan chooses to cover less than Original Medicare for some benefits, such as Skilled Nursing Facility care, the savings may be passed along to consumers by offering even lower co-payments for doctor visits (or any other plus or minus aggregation approved by CMS).


"My journey of helping individuals and families began as a hospice social worker. I worked closely with individuals and families to provide a "total care" approach while offering guidance through the emotional process of death. Now in private practice, I have worked with many cases successfully. I use the "total care" approach with each client and continually see improvement in their wellbeing. I look forward to supporting you and increasing your likelihood of personal success."
Medicare is a national health insurance program in the United States, begun in 1966 under the Social Security Administration (SSA) and now administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). It provides health insurance for Americans aged 65 and older, younger people with some disability status as determined by the Social Security Administration, as well as people with end stage renal disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease).

Less expensive plans have fewer benefits and higher out-of-pocket costs. More expensive plans include extra benefits, like some Medicare deductibles, additional hospital benefits, at-home recovery, and more. You have to decide what sort of plan makes the most sense for you. If you drop your Medigap policy, there is no guarantee you will be able to get it back.
If you’re eligible at age 65, your initial enrollment period begins three months before your 65th birthday, includes the month you turn age 65, and ends three months after that birthday. However, if you don’t enroll in Medicare Part B during your initial enrollment period, you have another chance each year to sign up during a “general enrollment period” from January 1 through March 31. Your coverage begins on July 1 of the year you enroll. Read our Medicare publication for more information.

CMS projections in 2018 estimated that the average basic premium for a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan will fall to $32.50 per month this year from its $33.59 last year. But you need to look beyond the premiums to determine your total costs: Make a list of your prescription medications, then check out your plan’s formularies to make sure your drugs are covered and to learn which tier your drugs are in. (The higher the tier, the higher your copay.) And look at the costs of deductibles and coinsurance, especially if you’re taking expensive specialty drugs.
Parts B and D are partially funded by premiums paid by Medicare enrollees and general U.S. Treasury revenue (to which Medicare beneficiaries contributed and may still contribute of course). In 2006, a surtax was added to Part B premium for higher-income seniors to partially fund Part D. In the Affordable Care Act's legislation of 2010, another surtax was then added to Part D premium for higher-income seniors to partially fund the Affordable Care Act and the number of Part B beneficiaries subject to the 2006 surtax was doubled, also partially to fund PPACA.
"I assist adults seeking help with depression, anxiety, panic, stress, OCD, trauma, anger, relationship problems, career concerns, loss, meaning, mortality and other issues. Whether individual or couple, I tailor an approach specific to your need. Existential therapy is my foundation though I use an eclectic approach and draw upon various therapies. Therapy may be brief in duration or lengthy. It is sometimes uncomfortable - the "price" of honest introspection and change. I don't have your "answer" but will help you seek it. I strive - in the words of Irvin Yalom - to help "remove obstacles blocking the patient's path"."
Part B also helps with durable medical equipment (DME), including but not limited to canes, walkers, lift chairs, wheelchairs, and mobility scooters for those with mobility impairments. Prosthetic devices such as artificial limbs and breast prosthesis following mastectomy, as well as one pair of eyeglasses following cataract surgery, and oxygen for home use are also covered.[44]

Humana is a Fortune 500 company offering several health insurance plans, including Medicare supplement plans. It services over 13 million customers and has won numerous awards from the National Business Group on Health, American Heart Association, Military Times and other organizations for the company’s insurance products and responsible business practices.
Most Medicare enrollees do not pay a monthly Part A premium, because they (or a spouse) have had 40 or more 3-month quarters in which they paid Federal Insurance Contributions Act taxes. The benefit is the same no matter how much or how little the beneficiary paid as long as the minimum number of quarters is reached. Medicare-eligible persons who do not have 40 or more quarters of Medicare-covered employment may buy into Part A for an annual adjusted monthly premium of:
Be sure to sign up for Medicare supplement insurance within the 6-month window after you turn 65 (or elder) AND enroll in Medicare Part B. When asked what the number one biggest mistake Americans make is regarding Medicare supplemental insurance, a spokesman with the U.S. Social Security Administration told us “Everyone thinks they have enough coverage when they’re 65 if they’re working or if they have insurance through their spouse. They don’t think they have to sign up. Then later they find out they have missed their open enrollment period.”

"Asking for help can be scary, but taking that first step can change your life for the better. If you are ready to start taking control of your life, I am here to help. My goal as a therapist is to help my clients create the life they envision for themselves. For some, that may be having stronger and healthier relationships. For others, it may be developing a deeper love for oneself. You may wish to advance in your career, be a better parent, or heal the wounds of trauma. If you are picturing a different life for yourself, now may the time to start making that picture a reality. "
There is some controversy over who exactly should take responsibility for coordinating the care of the dual eligibles. There have been some proposals to transfer dual eligibles into existing Medicaid managed care plans, which are controlled by individual states.[143] But many states facing severe budget shortfalls might have some incentive to stint on necessary care or otherwise shift costs to enrollees and their families to capture some Medicaid savings. Medicare has more experience managing the care of older adults, and is already expanding coordinated care programs under the ACA,[144] though there are some questions about private Medicare plans' capacity to manage care and achieve meaningful cost savings.[145]

In states with lots of rural areas, like Minnesota, Medicare Cost plans tend to be more popular because they offer more flexibility than an HMO. If a plan member gets services inside of the network of Medicare Cost Plans, they work the same way that an HMO works. If the plan member decides to visit a non-network medical provider, Medicare Cost Plans will cover those services the same way that Original Medicare Part A and Part B do. Typically, a Medicare Advantage HMO won’t cover non-emergency services outside of the network at all.


In 2006, the SGR mechanism was scheduled to decrease physician payments by 4.4%. (This number results from a 7% decrease in physician payments times a 2.8% inflation adjustment increase.) Congress overrode this decrease in the Deficit Reduction Act (P.L. 109-362), and held physician payments in 2006 at their 2005 levels. Similarly, another congressional act held 2007 payments at their 2006 levels, and HR 6331 held 2008 physician payments to their 2007 levels, and provided for a 1.1% increase in physician payments in 2009. Without further continuing congressional intervention, the SGR is expected to decrease physician payments from 25% to 35% over the next several years.
Some "hospital services" are provided as inpatient services, which would be reimbursed under Part A; or as outpatient services, which would be reimbursed, not under Part A, but under Part B instead. The "Two-Midnight Rule" decides which is which. In August 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced a final rule concerning eligibility for hospital inpatient services effective October 1, 2013. Under the new rule, if a physician admits a Medicare beneficiary as an inpatient with an expectation that the patient will require hospital care that "crosses two midnights," Medicare Part A payment is "generally appropriate." However, if it is anticipated that the patient will require hospital care for less than two midnights, Medicare Part A payment is generally not appropriate; payment such as is approved will be paid under Part B.[29] The time a patient spends in the hospital before an inpatient admission is formally ordered is considered outpatient time. But, hospitals and physicians can take into consideration the pre-inpatient admission time when determining if a patient's care will reasonably be expected to cross two midnights to be covered under Part A.[30] In addition to deciding which trust fund is used to pay for these various outpatient vs. inpatient charges, the number of days for which a person is formally considered an admitted patient affects eligibility for Part A skilled nursing services.
The current disenrollment opportunity applies only to people who have a Medicare Advantage plan. (If you already chose original Medicare, you have to stick with it for 2019.) So if you’re unhappy with your Advantage plan—maybe you find it more expensive than you expected or it doesn’t cover all the services you need—now is the time to make a change.
The standardized Medigap plans each cover certain Medicare out-of-pocket costs to at least some degree. Every Medigap plan covers up to one year of Medicare Part A coinsurance and hospital costs after Medicare benefits are used up. But, for example, Medigap Plan G plans don’t cover your Medicare Part B deductible, while Medigap Plan C plans do. So, if you’d like to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan, you might want to compare the Medigap policies carefully.
It is important to understand your Medicare coverage choices and to pick your coverage carefully. How you choose to get your benefits and who you get them from can affect your out-of-pocket costs and where you can get your care. For instance, in Original Medicare, you are covered to go to nearly all doctors and hospitals in the country. On the other hand, Medicare Advantage Plans typically have network restrictions, meaning that you will likely be more limited in your choice of doctors and hospitals. However, Medicare Advantage Plans can also provide additional benefits that Original Medicare does not cover, such as routine vision or dental care.

This absolutely varies by region. Since Medicare supplement insurance plans are standardized, you don’t have to worry about benefits being different. This means you’ll want to scout out the Medicare gap plans with the lowest rates in your area. The best supplemental insurance rates will be different in each state, and your age, gender, tobacco usage and eligibility for household discount also affect your rate.
[[state-start:AL,AK,AZ,AR,CA,CO,CT,DE,DC,FL,GA,GU,HI,ID,IL,IN,IA,KS,KY,LA,ME,MD,MA,MI,MN,MS,MO,MT,MP,NE,NV,NJ,NM,NY,NC,ND,OH,OK,OR,PA,PR,RI,SC,SD,TN,TX,UT,VT,VI,VA,WA,WV,WI,WY]]There are also coverage choices offered by private insurance companies like UnitedHealthcare. These include Medicare Advantage (Part C) plans and Medicare Prescription Drug (Part D) plans, and Medicare Supplement plans. Let's learn more.[[state-end]]
Of the 35,476 total active applicants who participated in The National Resident Matching Program in 2016, 75.6% (26,836) were able to find PGY-1 (R-1) matches. Out of the total active applicants, 51.27% (18,187) were graduates of conventional US medical schools; 93.8% (17,057) were able to find a match. In comparison, match rates were 80.3% of osteopathic graduates, 53.9% of US citizen international medical school graduates, and 50.5% of non-US citizen international medical schools graduates.[107]

You should be informed before buying. If you’re reading this guide, that’s a good start. And in general you should be a skeptical buyer, although Medigap insurance is heavily regulated. Still, shopping for insurance can be exhausting, but the best companies make the process as streamlined as possible. Look for a company that caters to your needs, such as a physical office for a face-to-face meeting, a helpful customer service representative on the phone, or online chat.
We are not an insurance agency and are not affiliated with any plan. We connect individuals with insurance providers and other affiliates (collectively, “partners”) to give you, the consumer, an opportunity to get information about insurance and connect with agents. By completing the quotes form or calling the number listed above, you will be directed to a partner that can connect you to an appropriate insurance agent who can answer your questions and discuss plan options.
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