Plan Benefits Plan A Plan B Plan C Plan F2 Plan G Plan K Plan L Plan N Medicare Part A coinsurance and coverage for hospital benefits Included Included Included Included Included Included Included $20 copay for office visits; $50 copay for ER Medicare Part B coinsurance or copayment Included Included Included Included Included 50% 75% Included Blood (first three pints) Included Included Included Included Included 50% 75% Included Hospice Care coinsurance or copayment Included Included Included Included Included 50% 75% Included Skilled Nursing Facility Care coinsurance Included Included Included 50% 75% Included Medicare Part A deductible Included Included Included Included 50% 75% Included Medicare Part B deductible Included Included Medicare Part B excess charges Included Included Foreign Travel Emergency (up to plan limits) Included Included Included Included
"I enjoy working with and supporting individuals who are curious and motivated to move through the "stuck places" we all find ourselves in from time to time. I believe that our bodies have an inherent wisdom that, when listened to through mindfulness, will help direct and focus the therapy. While I specialize in treating childhood trauma, I also work with individuals dealing with anxiety, depression, relationship/personal growth challenges, as well as people struggling with illness and physical pain. I find great joy in walking with people on their journeys towards a more authentic, vibrant self...your own "True North"!"
Less expensive plans have fewer benefits and higher out-of-pocket costs. More expensive plans include extra benefits, like some Medicare deductibles, additional hospital benefits, at-home recovery, and more. You have to decide what sort of plan makes the most sense for you. If you drop your Medigap policy, there is no guarantee you will be able to get it back.

You should be informed before buying. If you’re reading this guide, that’s a good start. And in general you should be a skeptical buyer, although Medigap insurance is heavily regulated. Still, shopping for insurance can be exhausting, but the best companies make the process as streamlined as possible. Look for a company that caters to your needs, such as a physical office for a face-to-face meeting, a helpful customer service representative on the phone, or online chat.


Medicare supplement Plan F has also been the #1 seller with Baby Boomers for many years. According to a report from America’s Health Insurance professionals, about 57% of all Medigap policies in force were a premium Medicare Plan F policy. (In recent years, Plan G has been the second most popular Medicare supplement plan, and you can read more on that below.)
As a Medicare beneficiary, you may also be enrolled in other types of coverage, either through the Medicare program or other sources, such as an employer. When you first sign up for Original Medicare, you’ll fill out a form called the Initial Enrollment Questionnaire and be asked whether you have other types of insurance. It’s important to include all other types of coverage you have in this questionnaire. Medicare uses this information when deciding who pays first when you receive health-care services.

If you are one of millions of Americans working after 65, your employer health insurance coverage may be all you need for now. Medicare supplement open enrollment generally won’t begin for you until you enroll in Medicare Part B. If you haven’t enrolled in Part B yet, you should consider waiting to enroll until you are ready for your Medicare supplement open enrollment to begin. There are some notable exceptions for Part B and employer coverage.
Even if your prescriptions are covered, there may be hurdles to accessing them, so check the plan's rules. Starting in 2019, Medicare Advantage plans are allowed to require "step therapy," which means, in certain cases, you’ll need to try a less expensive drug before you'll be covered for a more expensive one. Or you may be steered toward a preferred pharmacy instead of your local drugstore.

The open enrollment period for Medicare runs from October 15 through December 7 on an annual basis, however, this is not the case for individuals interested in Medigap (Medicare Supplement) coverage. The open enrollment period for a Medigap policy is the six month period that starts the first day of the month that you turn 65 or older and enrolled in Part B. After this period, your ability to buy a Medigap policy may be limited and it may be more costly. Each state handles things differently, but there are additional open enrollment periods in some cases.
Less expensive plans have fewer benefits and higher out-of-pocket costs. More expensive plans include extra benefits, like some Medicare deductibles, additional hospital benefits, at-home recovery, and more. You have to decide what sort of plan makes the most sense for you. If you drop your Medigap policy, there is no guarantee you will be able to get it back.
If you decide to sign up for a Medicare Advantage plan, you may want to shop around, because costs and coverage details are likely to vary. Our obligation-free eHealthMedicare plan finder tool on this page lets you see all available Medicare Advantage options in your area, including a list of coverage details once you click on the plan of interest.
A 2001 study by the Government Accountability Office evaluated the quality of responses given by Medicare contractor customer service representatives to provider (physician) questions. The evaluators assembled a list of questions, which they asked during a random sampling of calls to Medicare contractors. The rate of complete, accurate information provided by Medicare customer service representatives was 15%.[100] Since then, steps have been taken to improve the quality of customer service given by Medicare contractors, specifically the 1-800-MEDICARE contractor. As a result, 1-800-MEDICARE customer service representatives (CSR) have seen an increase in training, quality assurance monitoring has significantly increased, and a customer satisfaction survey is offered to random callers.
Retirement of the Baby Boom generation is projected by 2030 to increase enrollment to more than 80 million. In addition the facts that the number of workers per enrollee will decline from 3.7 to 2.4 and that overall health care costs in the nation are rising pose substantial financial challenges to the program. Medicare spending is projected to increase from just over $740 billion in 2018 to just over $1.2 trillion by 2026, or from 3.7% of GDP to 4.7%.[19] Baby-boomers are projected to have longer life spans, which will add to the future Medicare spending. The 2019 Medicare Trustees Report estimates that spending as a percent of GDP will grow to 6% by 2043 (when the last of the baby boomers turns 80) and then flatten out to 6.5% if GDP by 2093. In response to these financial challenges, Congress made substantial cuts to future payouts to providers (primarily acute care hospitals and skilled nursing facilities) as part of PPACA in 2010 and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and policymakers have offered many additional competing proposals to reduce Medicare costs further.
Medicare funds the vast majority of residency training in the US. This tax-based financing covers resident salaries and benefits through payments called Direct Medical Education payments. Medicare also uses taxes for Indirect Medical Education, a subsidy paid to teaching hospitals in exchange for training resident physicians.[102] For the 2008 fiscal year these payments were $2.7 and $5.7 billion respectively.[103] Overall funding levels have remained at the same level since 1996, so that the same number or fewer residents have been trained under this program.[104] Meanwhile, the US population continues to grow both older and larger, which has led to greater demand for physicians, in part due to higher rates of illness and disease among the elderly compared to younger individuals. At the same time the cost of medical services continue rising rapidly and many geographic areas face physician shortages, both trends suggesting the supply of physicians remains too low.[105]
The dual-eligible population comprises roughly 20 percent of Medicare's enrollees but accounts for 36 percent of its costs.[139] There is substantial evidence that these individuals receive highly inefficient care because responsibility for their care is split between the Medicare and Medicaid programs[140]—most see a number of different providers without any kind of mechanism to coordinate their care, and they face high rates of potentially preventable hospitalizations.[141] Because Medicaid and Medicare cover different aspects of health care, both have a financial incentive to shunt patients into care the other program pays for.
The costs of Medicare Supplement Insurance plans in Michigan may vary depending on the provider and the area in which you are located. However, Medigap benefits are consistent between lettered plan types, no matter where you live. It is recommended that you find out what Medigap policies are available to you, and determine which plan type is best depending on your health needs and budget.
Both House Republicans and President Obama proposed increasing the additional premiums paid by the wealthiest people with Medicare, compounding several reforms in the ACA that would increase the number of wealthier individuals paying higher, income-related Part B and Part D premiums. Such proposals are projected to save $20 billion over the course of a decade,[147] and would ultimately result in more than a quarter of Medicare enrollees paying between 35 and 90 percent of their Part B costs by 2035, rather than the typical 25 percent. If the brackets mandated for 2035 were implemented today,[when?] it would mean that anyone earning more than $47,000 (as an individual) or $94,000 (as a couple) would be affected. Under the Republican proposals, affected individuals would pay 40 percent of the total Part B and Part D premiums, which would be equivalent of $2,500 today.[148]

"I provide Therapy regarding depression, marriage counseling, couples counseling, women's issues, trauma, abuse, PTSD, LGBTQ and Trans specific issues, etc. I work with a variety of people who are at different places in their lives. As a Therapist I offer a personalized approach that is tailored to each client's needs, focusing on the personal growth that each person desires. My therapeutic style is active and engaging, with the intention of fostering insight, awareness and facilitating desired change. My counseling group also offers a variety of support groups when needed. Please take that first step, call to inquire."


Part A Late Enrollment Penalty If you are not eligible for premium-free Part A, and you don't buy a premium-based Part A when you're first eligible, your monthly premium may go up 10%. You must pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you could have had Part A, but didn't sign-up. For example, if you were eligible for Part A for 2 years but didn't sign-up, you must pay the higher premium for 4 years. Usually, you don't have to pay a penalty if you meet certain conditions that allow you to sign up for Part A during a Special Enrollment Period.
"Welcome. You might be looking for a guide through troubled waters for yourself or someone you care about. I enjoy working with people who desire to live authentic lives and grow to their full potential. I can improve understanding of your symptoms, but each of us are unique individuals with differences in responses, I treat people, not diagnosis. I enjoy working with professionals and couples. I see everyone as a work in progress. I consider therapy a journey we take together that is rich in meaning and fulfillment. We are body, mind and spirit and I use a wholeness approach."
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