Because of how Part D works and depending on income, a patient could pay between 35 percent and 85 percent of the cost of some of their prescription drugs if they need enough medication to push them into the notorious doughnut hole, when Part D's full prescription-drug coverage runs out after a person has spent $3,750, until their medication costs exceed $5,000 per year. (In 2019, coverage will end at $3,750 and begin again at $5,000.) During the coverage gap, the patient would be responsible for 25 percent of covered, brand-name prescription drugs.

If you decide to stay with Medicare Advantage and just switch plans, use the Medicare Plan Finder tool or call Medicare (800-MEDICARE or 800-633-4227) to find out what other plans are available in your area and compare them. Here again, don’t just focus on low monthly premiums. Some plans advertise $0 premium policies. But focusing on low monthly costs alone is a mistake.
Enrollment in public Part C health plans, including Medicare Advantage plans, grew from about 1% of total Medicare enrollment in 1997 when the law was passed (the 1% representing people on pre-law demonstration programs) to about 36% in 2018. Of course the absolute number of beneficiaries on Part C has increased even more dramatically on a percentage basis because of the large increase of people on Original Medicare since 1997. Almost all Medicare beneficiaries have access to at least two public Medicare Part C plans; most have access to three or more.
Under the 2003 law that created Medicare Part D, the Social Security Administration offers an Extra Help program to lower-income seniors such that they have almost no drug costs; in addition approximately 25 states offer additional assistance on top of Part D. It should be noted again for beneficiaries who are dual-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid eligible) Medicaid may pay for drugs not covered by Part D of Medicare. Most of this aid to lower-income seniors was available to them through other programs before Part D was implemented.
The standardized Medigap plans each cover certain Medicare out-of-pocket costs to at least some degree. Every Medigap plan covers up to one year of Medicare Part A coinsurance and hospital costs after Medicare benefits are used up. But, for example, Medigap Plan G plans don’t cover your Medicare Part B deductible, while Medigap Plan C plans do. So, if you’d like to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan, you might want to compare the Medigap policies carefully.
Less expensive plans have fewer benefits and higher out-of-pocket costs. More expensive plans include extra benefits, like some Medicare deductibles, additional hospital benefits, at-home recovery, and more. You have to decide what sort of plan makes the most sense for you. If you drop your Medigap policy, there is no guarantee you will be able to get it back.
The 10 different Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plans available in most states have standardized benefits across each plan letter. For example, Medigap Plan A will have the same benefits regardless of which state you live in or which insurance company you buy from. If you live in Massachusetts, Minnesota, or Wisconsin, the Medigap plans in these states are standardized differently.
* NY: In New York, the Excess Charge is limited to 5%; PA and OH: Note: Under Pennsylvania and Ohio law, a physician may not charge or collect fees from Medicare patients which exceed the Medicare-approved Part B charge. Plans F and G pay benefits for excess charges when services are rendered in a jurisdiction not having a balance billing law; TX: In Texas, the amount cannot exceed 15% over the Medicare- approved amount or any other charge limitation established by the Medicare program or state law. Note that the limiting charge applies only to certain services and does not apply to some supplies and durable medical equipment; VT: Vermont law generally prohibits a physician from charging more than the Medicare-approved amount. However, there are exceptions and this prohibition may not apply if you receive services out of state.
Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) plans: This type of Medicare Advantage plan offers more provider flexibility. PPOs typically have a preferred provider network, but you may also use out-of-network doctors if you choose, although your cost sharing may be higher. Unlike HMOs, you don’t need referrals for specialist care and you aren’t required to have a primary care doctor.
Under the 2003 law that created Medicare Part D, the Social Security Administration offers an Extra Help program to lower-income seniors such that they have almost no drug costs; in addition approximately 25 states offer additional assistance on top of Part D. It should be noted again for beneficiaries who are dual-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid eligible) Medicaid may pay for drugs not covered by Part D of Medicare. Most of this aid to lower-income seniors was available to them through other programs before Part D was implemented.
The 2003 payment formulas succeeded in increasing the percentage of rural and inner city poor that could take advantage of the OOP limit and lower co-pays and deductibles—as well as the coordinated medical care—associated with Part C plans. In practice however, one set of Medicare beneficiaries received more benefits than others. The MedPAC Congressional advisory group found in one year the comparative difference for "like beneficiaries" was as high as 14% and have tended to average about 2% higher.[47] The word "like" in the previous sentence is key. MedPAC does not include all beneficiaries in its comparisons and MedPAC will not define what it means by "like" but it apparently includes people who are only on Part A, which severely skews its percentage comparisons—see January 2017 MedPAC meeting presentations. The differences caused by the 2003-law payment formulas were almost completely eliminated by PPACA and have been almost totally phased out according to the 2018 MedPAC annual report, March 2018. One remaining special-payment-formula program—designed primarily for unions wishing to sponsor a Part C plan—is being phased out beginning in 2017. In 2013 and since, on average a Part C beneficiary cost the Medicare Trust Funds 2%-5% less than a beneficiary on traditional fee for service Medicare, completely reversing the situation in 2006-2009 right after implementation of the 2003 law and restoring the capitated fee vs fee for service funding balance to its original intended parity level.
When looking at coverage choices, there’s a lot to consider. You may enroll in Medicare Part A (hospital insurance), Medicare Part B (medical insurance) or both. Once you enroll in Original Medicare (Parts A & B), you may have other coverage choices, too, such as a Medicare Advantage plan (Part C), a Medicare Prescription Drug plan (Part D) or a Medicare Supplement insurance plan (Medigap).
‡Advantage Plus is available for all Senior Advantage (HMO) and Medicare Advantage (HMO) individual plan members. Advantage Plus is available for all Medicare Plus (Cost) individual plan members, except for Basic plans. In California, Advantage Plus is not available under the Medicare Medi-Cal (HMO SNP) plan. In Colorado, Advantage Plus is not available under the Medicare Medicaid (HMO SNP) plan.

Part D Total Premium: The Part D Total Premium is the sum of the Basic and Supplemental Premiums. Note: the Part D Total Premium is net of any Part A/B rebates applied to "buy down" the drug premium for Medicare Advantage; for some plans the total premium may be lower than the sum of the basic and supplemental premiums due to negative basic or supplemental premiums.
In 47 states, there are 10 standardized Medicare Supplement insurance plans that are denoted by the letters A through N (plans E, H, I, and J are no longer sold). The private insurance companies offering these plans do not have to offer every Medicare Supplement plan, but they must offer at least Plan A. If an insurance company chooses to offer any Medicare Supplement insurance plans in addition to Plan A, it must offer either Plan C or Plan F along with any other standardized Medicare Supplement insurance plans it offers.
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The answer really depends on what you are looking for: supplemental health insurance plans designed for seniors or Medicare supplement plans. Although they are often confused because of their similar terminology, they are very different. So before we give you the cost of supplemental health insurance for seniors, let’s review the differences between these two lines of products.
The average cost of monthly premiums for insurance in Minnesota is $477, which may be too expensive for some of the residents in the state. However, the US federal government offers more affordable Minnesota Medicare insurance coverage for beneficiaries over the age of 65, and some workers with disabilities may qualify as well. The Minnesota state government also offers various assistance programs for Medicare beneficiaries.
More limited income-relation of premiums only raises limited revenue. Currently, only 5 percent of Medicare enrollees pay an income-related premium, and most only pay 35 percent of their total premium, compared to the 25 percent most people pay. Only a negligible number of enrollees fall into the higher income brackets required to bear a more substantial share of their costs—roughly half a percent of individuals and less than three percent of married couples currently pay more than 35 percent of their total Part B costs.[149]
The original program included Parts A and B. Part-C-like plans have existed as demonstration projects in Medicare since the early 1970s, but the Part was formalized by 1997 legislation. Part D was enacted by 2003 legislation and introduced January 1, 2006. Previously coverage for self-administered prescription drugs, if desired, was obtained by private insurance or through a public Part C plan (or by one of its predecessor demonstration plans before enactment).

As of January 1, 2016, Medicare's unfunded obligation over the 75 year timeframe is $3.8 trillion for the Part A Trust Fund and $28.6 trillion for Part B. Over an infinite timeframe the combined unfunded liability for both programs combined is over $50 trillion, with the difference primarily in the Part B estimate.[88][90] These estimates assume that CMS will pay full benefits as currently specified over those periods though that would be contrary to current United States law. In addition, as discussed throughout each annual Trustees' report, "the Medicare projections shown could be substantially understated as a result of other potentially unsustainable elements of current law." For example, current law effectively provides no raises for doctors after 2025; that is unlikely to happen. It is impossible for actuaries to estimate unfunded liability other than assuming current law is followed (except relative to benefits as noted), the Trustees state "that actual long-range present values for (Part A) expenditures and (Part B/D) expenditures and revenues could exceed the amounts estimated by a substantial margin."
The standardized Medigap plans each cover certain Medicare out-of-pocket costs to at least some degree. Every Medigap plan covers up to one year of Medicare Part A coinsurance and hospital costs after Medicare benefits are used up. But, for example, Medigap Plan G plans don’t cover your Medicare Part B deductible, while Medigap Plan C plans do. So, if you’d like to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan, you might want to compare the Medigap policies carefully.
Because Medicare offers statutorily determined benefits, its coverage policies and payment rates are publicly known, and all enrollees are entitled to the same coverage. In the private insurance market, plans can be tailored to offer different benefits to different customers, enabling individuals to reduce coverage costs while assuming risks for care that is not covered. Insurers, however, have far fewer disclosure requirements than Medicare, and studies show that customers in the private sector can find it difficult to know what their policy covers.[78] and at what cost.[79] Moreover, since Medicare collects data about utilization and costs for its enrollees—data that private insurers treat as trade secrets—it gives researchers key information about health care system performance.
Medigap plans work differently than Advantage plans. Mostly, when you have an Advantage plan, you will use that instead of Part A and Part B. In contrast, Medicare supplement plans work with your basic benefits to fill in some gaps for coinsurance. The advantages of supplements are that they don’t rely upon plan networks and offer stable benefits from year to year. You can use your supplement all over the country, and in some cases, for urgent medical services outside of the country.

Medicare has four basic parts: A, B, C, and D. Taken together, Parts A (hospital care), B (doctors, medical procedures, equipment), and D (prescription drugs) provide basic coverage for Americans 65 and older. What's relevant for this article is what these parts don't cover, such as deductibles, co-pays, and other medical expenses that could wipe out your savings should you become seriously ill. That's where Part C comes in. Also known as Medicare Advantage, it's one of two ways to protect against the potentially high cost of an accident or illness. The other option is Medicare Supplement Insurance, also called Medigap coverage. Here's a look at the two options.
Blue Cross plans on sending letters in early July notifying about 200,000 subscribers who stand to lose their Medicare Cost plans. Minnetonka-based Medica, which started sending letters last week, expects that about 66,000 members will need to select a new plan. Officials with Bloomington-based HealthPartners say the insurer sent letters to about 34,000 enrollees this month explaining the change.
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This concept is basically how public Medicare Part C already works (but with a much more complicated competitive bidding process that drives up costs for the Trustees, but is very advantageous to the beneficiaries). Given that only about 1% of people on Medicare got premium support when Aaron and Reischauer first wrote their proposal in 1995 and the percentage is now 35% on the way to 50% by 2040 according to the Trustees, perhaps no further reform is needed.
Part D Total Premium: The Part D Total Premium is the sum of the Basic and Supplemental Premiums. Note: the Part D Total Premium is net of any Part A/B rebates applied to "buy down" the drug premium for Medicare Advantage; for some plans the total premium may be lower than the sum of the basic and supplemental premiums due to negative basic or supplemental premiums.
In 2002, payment rates were cut by 4.8%. In 2003, payment rates were scheduled to be reduced by 4.4%. However, Congress boosted the cumulative SGR target in the Consolidated Appropriation Resolution of 2003 (P.L. 108-7), allowing payments for physician services to rise 1.6%. In 2004 and 2005, payment rates were again scheduled to be reduced. The Medicare Modernization Act (P.L. 108-173) increased payments 1.5% for those two years.
One unique feature of a Medicare Supplement insurance plan in California is known as the “birthday rule.” According to this rule, beneficiaries in the state are allowed to buy a new Medicare Supplement insurance plan for 30 days following their birthday each year. The new plan must have equal or lesser coverage than their original plan. During this “birthday” period, Medicare beneficiaries are not subject to medical underwriting like they would be during other times of the year.
Now that you know more about Medicare Supplement plans, you may be wondering if one of these plans may be right for you. I always enjoy helping people figure this out. If you’d like to start out by getting some more information in front of you, use the links below, which let you schedule a phone appointment or have me email you information about plans. To take a look at all available Medicare plans right now, use the Compare Plans buttons on this page. To get to know me better, take a look at my photo and profile below (see my profile by clicking on the “View profile” link).
It is best to enroll in a Medigap plan during your six-month Medigap Open Enrollment Period starting the first day of the month you are 65 or older and are enrolled in Medicare Part B. During this time, you may enroll in any Medicare Supplement Insurance plan in Michigan, even if you have health problems. No medical underwriting is required, premiums are not higher based on pre-existing conditions*, and you have the guaranteed issue right to enroll in a plan of your choosing.
If you are enrolled in Medicare Part A and B (Original Medicare), Medigap plans can help fill the coverage gaps in Medicare Part A and Part B. Medigap plans are sold by private insurance companies and are designed to assist you with out-of-pocket costs (e.g. deductibles, copays and coinsurance) not covered by Parts A and B. These plans are available in all 50 states and can vary in premiums and enrollment eligibility. Medigap plans are standardized; however, all of the standardized plans may not be available in your area.
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Medicare supplement Plan F has also been the #1 seller with Baby Boomers for many years. According to a report from America’s Health Insurance professionals, about 57% of all Medigap policies in force were a premium Medicare Plan F policy. (In recent years, Plan G has been the second most popular Medicare supplement plan, and you can read more on that below.)
**NY: In New York, the Excess Charge is limited to 5%; PA and OH: Under Pennsylvania and Ohio law, a physician may not charge or collect fees from Medicare patients which exceed the Medicare-approved Part B charge. Plans F and G pay benefits for excess charges when services are rendered in a jurisdiction not having a balance billing law; TX: In Texas, the amount cannot exceed 15% over the Medicare approved amount or any other charge limitation established by the Medicare program or state law. Note that the limiting charge applies only to certain services and does not apply to some supplies and durable medical equipment; VT: Vermont law generally prohibits a physician from charging more than the Medicare approved amount. However, there are exceptions and this prohibition may not apply if you receive services out of state. 

Helpfulness: You can search the site for the closest available agent for a face-to-face talk, or fill out a quick online form stating specific times you’re available for a customer service representative to call you – as well as include any notes to explain your needs. The site also features an education section titled “Planning and Advice” which is essentially a Medicare 101 info center to turn you into a Medicare pro. The section includes helpful articles touching on topics including your enrollment period and eligibility rules. That way you can read up on an arsenal of info before you reach out to a representative so you have a better handle on what to ask and what you’re looking for.
The open enrollment period for Medicare runs from October 15 through December 7 on an annual basis, however, this is not the case for individuals interested in Medigap (Medicare Supplement) coverage. The open enrollment period for a Medigap policy is the six month period that starts the first day of the month that you turn 65 or older and enrolled in Part B. After this period, your ability to buy a Medigap policy may be limited and it may be more costly. Each state handles things differently, but there are additional open enrollment periods in some cases.
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