This measure involves only Part A. The trust fund is considered insolvent when available revenue plus any existing balances will not cover 100 percent of annual projected costs. According to the latest estimate by the Medicare trustees (2018), the trust fund is expected to become insolvent in 8 years (2026), at which time available revenue will cover around 85 percent of annual projected costs for Part A services.[88] Since Medicare began, this solvency projection has ranged from two to 28 years, with an average of 11.3 years.[89] This and other projections in Medicare Trustees reports are based on what its actuaries call intermediate scenario but the reports also include worst-case and best case scenarios that are quite different (other scenarios presume Congress will change present law).

We provide our Q1Medicare.com site for educational purposes and strive to present unbiased and accurate information. However, Q1Medicare is not intended as a substitute for your lawyer, doctor, healthcare provider, financial advisor, or pharmacist. For more information on your Medicare coverage, please be sure to seek legal, medical, pharmaceutical, or financial advice from a licensed professional or telephone Medicare at 1-800-633-4227.
Medicare Advantage is a PPO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Medicare Advantage depends on contract renewal. Enrollment in the plan after December 31, 2018 cannot be guaranteed. Either CMS or the plan may choose not to renew the contract, or the plan may choose to change the area it serves. Any such change may result in termination of your enrollment. Benefits, premiums, copayments and/or coinsurance may change on January 1 of each year. The formulary, pharmacy network and/or provider network may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. 

Medicare supplement Plan F has also been the #1 seller with Baby Boomers for many years. According to a report from America’s Health Insurance professionals, about 57% of all Medigap policies in force were a premium Medicare Plan F policy. (In recent years, Plan G has been the second most popular Medicare supplement plan, and you can read more on that below.)
If you decide to sign up for a Medicare Advantage plan, you may want to shop around, because costs and coverage details are likely to vary. Our obligation-free eHealthMedicare plan finder tool on this page lets you see all available Medicare Advantage options in your area, including a list of coverage details once you click on the plan of interest.
Because of how Part D works and depending on income, a patient could pay between 35 percent and 85 percent of the cost of some of their prescription drugs if they need enough medication to push them into the notorious doughnut hole, when Part D's full prescription-drug coverage runs out after a person has spent $3,750, until their medication costs exceed $5,000 per year. (In 2019, coverage will end at $3,750 and begin again at $5,000.) During the coverage gap, the patient would be responsible for 25 percent of covered, brand-name prescription drugs.
The current disenrollment opportunity applies only to people who have a Medicare Advantage plan. (If you already chose original Medicare, you have to stick with it for 2019.) So if you’re unhappy with your Advantage plan—maybe you find it more expensive than you expected or it doesn’t cover all the services you need—now is the time to make a change.
Medicare beneficiaries in Michigan who are enrolled in Original Medicare (Part A and B) may find that these plans do not cover all of their health expenses. However, Medicare beneficiaries in Michigan may opt to enroll in a Medicare Supplement plan, also known as Medigap, which may cover expenses such as copayments, deductibles, coinsurance, and possibly other out-of-pocket expenses. Most states offer ten standard Medigap policy options. 

If you decide to sign up for a Medigap policy, a good time to do so is during the Medigap Open Enrollment Period, a six-month period that typically starts the month you turn 65 and have Medicare Part B. If you enroll in a Medigap plan during this period, you can’t be turned down or charged more because of any health conditions. But if you apply for a Medigap plan later on, you may be subject to medical underwriting; your acceptance into a plan isn’t guaranteed.
Basic Plan helps cover Medicare's Parts A and B coinsurance, hospice care coinsurance or copayment, skilled nursing facility care coinsurance, the first 3 pints of blood each year, and Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare. Basic Plan with Copay covers the same benefits as Basic Plan for Medicare Part A. For Medicare Part B medical expenses, the plan pays generally 20%, other than up to $20 per office visit and up to $50 per emergency room visit. The copayment of up to $50 is waived if you are admitted to any hospital and the emergency visit is covered as a Medicare Part A expense. This plan also covers the Wisconsin Mandated Benefits when not covered by Medicare.

Under federal law, insurers cannot deny you Medigap insurance when you initially enroll in Medicare at age 65, and they must renew your coverage annually as long as you pay your premiums. But if you try to buy Medigap insurance outside of that initial enrollment period, insurers in many states can deny coverage or charge you higher premiums based on your health or pre-existing conditions.
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Medicare has four basic parts: A, B, C, and D. Taken together, Parts A (hospital care), B (doctors, medical procedures, equipment), and D (prescription drugs) provide basic coverage for Americans 65 and older. What's relevant for this article is what these parts don't cover, such as deductibles, co-pays, and other medical expenses that could wipe out your savings should you become seriously ill. That's where Part C comes in. Also known as Medicare Advantage, it's one of two ways to protect against the potentially high cost of an accident or illness. The other option is Medicare Supplement Insurance, also called Medigap coverage. Here's a look at the two options.
Part A covers inpatient hospital stays where the beneficiary has been formally admitted to the hospital, including semi-private room, food, and tests. As of January 1, 2018, Medicare Part A had an inpatient hospital deductible of $1340, coinsurance per day as $335 after 61 days confinement within one "spell of illness", coinsurance for "lifetime reserve days" (essentially, days 91-150 of one or more stay of more than 60 days) of $670 per day. The structure of coinsurance in a Skilled Nursing Facility (following a medically necessary hospital confinement of 3 nights in row or more) is different: zero for days 1-20; $167.50 per day for days 21-100. Many medical services provided under Part A (e.g., some surgery in an acute care hospital, some physical therapy in a skilled nursing facility) is covered under Part B. These coverage amounts increase or decrease yearly on 1st day of the year.
If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, you’re still enrolled in the Medicare program; in fact, you must sign up for Medicare Part A and Part B to be eligible for a Medicare Advantage plan. The Medicare Advantage plan administers your benefits to you. Depending on the plan, Medicare Advantage can offer additional benefits beyond your Part A and Part B benefits, such as routine dental, vision, and hearing services, and even prescription drug coverage.
Medicare MSA Plans combine a high deductible Medicare Advantage Plan and a trust or custodial savings account (as defined and/or approved by the IRS). The plan deposits money from Medicare into the account. You can use this money to pay for your health care costs, but only Medicare-covered expenses count toward your deductible. The amount deposited is usually less than your deductible amount, so you generally have to pay out-of-pocket before your coverage begins.
The Minnesota Department of Commerce: provides beneficiaries with information about Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans and other insurance options available to them. The office is a resource for information about protection from Medicare fraud and how to report fraud. Additional links are included for federal offices that deal with Medicare and brochures that explain how to enroll in Part D Prescription Drug Plans. This government office also offers downloads of premium guides for supplemental plans available to current Medicare beneficiaries in Minnesota.

In 2018, Medicare spending was over $740 billion, about 3.7% of U.S. gross domestic product and over 15% of total US federal spending.[19] Because of the two Trust funds and their differing revenue sources (one dedicated and one not), the Trustees analyze Medicare spending as a percent of GDP rather than versus the Federal budget. According to the 2019 Trustees Report, "The Trustees are issuing a determination of projected excess general revenue Medicare funding in this report because the difference between Medicare’s total outlays and its dedicated financing sources6 is projected to exceed 45 percent of outlays within 7 years. Since this determination was made last year (2018) as well, this year’s determination triggers a Medicare funding warning, which (i) requires the President to submit to Congress proposed legislation to respond to the warning within 15 days after the submission of the Fiscal Year 2021 Budget and (ii) requires Congress to consider the legislation on an expedited basis. This is the third consecutive year that a determination of excess general revenue Medicare funding has been issued, and the second consecutive year that a Medicare funding warning has been issued."
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