Medicare2019.com is a privately owned website and is not associated, endorsed or authorized by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services or any other government entity. This site contains basic information about Medicare, services related to Medicare, private medicare, Medigap and services for people with Medicare. If you would like to find more information about the Government Medicare program please visit the Official US Government Site: at www.medicare.gov
This link is being made available so that you have an opportunity to obtain information from the third party on its website. It is provided as a convenience and not as an endorsement of the content of the third party site or any products or services offered on that site. We do not take responsibility for the products or services offered or the content on any linked site or any link contained in a linked site.

The CBO projected that raising the age of Medicare eligibility would save $113 billion over 10 years after accounting for the necessary expansion of Medicaid and state health insurance exchange subsidies under health care reform, which are needed to help those who could not afford insurance purchase it.[130] The Kaiser Family Foundation found that raising the age of eligibility would save the federal government $5.7 billion a year, while raising costs for other payers. According to Kaiser, raising the age would cost $3.7 billion to 65- and 66-year-olds, $2.8 billion to other consumers whose premiums would rise as insurance pools absorbed more risk, $4.5 billion to employers offering insurance, and $0.7 billion to states expanding their Medicaid rolls. Ultimately Kaiser found that the plan would raise total social costs by more than twice the savings to the federal government.[131]
The Monthly Premium for Part B for 2019 is $135.50 per month but anyone on Social Security in 2019 is "held harmless" from that amount if the increase in their SS monthly benefit does not cover the increase in their Part B premium from 2018 to 2019. This hold harmless provision is significant in years when SS does not increase but that is not the case for 2019. There are additional income-weighted surtaxes for those with incomes more than $85,000 per annum.[45]
To help protect your identity, Medicare has sent you a new Medicare card. Your new card will have a new Medicare Number that’s unique to you, instead of your Social Security Number. If you did not receive your new Medicare card, there may be something that needs to be corrected, like your mailing address. You can update your mailing address by logging in to or creating your personal my Social Security account.

Some "hospital services" are provided as inpatient services, which would be reimbursed under Part A; or as outpatient services, which would be reimbursed, not under Part A, but under Part B instead. The "Two-Midnight Rule" decides which is which. In August 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced a final rule concerning eligibility for hospital inpatient services effective October 1, 2013. Under the new rule, if a physician admits a Medicare beneficiary as an inpatient with an expectation that the patient will require hospital care that "crosses two midnights," Medicare Part A payment is "generally appropriate." However, if it is anticipated that the patient will require hospital care for less than two midnights, Medicare Part A payment is generally not appropriate; payment such as is approved will be paid under Part B.[29] The time a patient spends in the hospital before an inpatient admission is formally ordered is considered outpatient time. But, hospitals and physicians can take into consideration the pre-inpatient admission time when determining if a patient's care will reasonably be expected to cross two midnights to be covered under Part A.[30] In addition to deciding which trust fund is used to pay for these various outpatient vs. inpatient charges, the number of days for which a person is formally considered an admitted patient affects eligibility for Part A skilled nursing services.
While the majority of providers accept Medicare assignments, (97 percent for some specialties),[64] and most physicians still accept at least some new Medicare patients, that number is in decline.[65] While 80% of physicians in the Texas Medical Association accepted new Medicare patients in 2000, only 60% were doing so by 2012.[66] A study published in 2012 concluded that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) relies on the recommendations of an American Medical Association advisory panel. The study led by Dr. Miriam J. Laugesen, of Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues at UCLA and the University of Illinois, shows that for services provided between 1994 and 2010, CMS agreed with 87.4% of the recommendations of the committee, known as RUC or the Relative Value Update Committee.[67]

American Indians can continue to use tribal and Indian Health Services (IHS) clinics. We will not require prior approval or impose any conditions for you to get services at these clinics. For elders 65 years and older this includes Elderly Waiver (EW) services accessed through the tribe. If a doctor or other provider in a tribal or IHS clinic refers you to a provider in our network, we will not require you to see your primary care provider prior to the referral.
If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, you’re still enrolled in the Medicare program; in fact, you must sign up for Medicare Part A and Part B to be eligible for a Medicare Advantage plan. The Medicare Advantage plan administers your benefits to you. Depending on the plan, Medicare Advantage can offer additional benefits beyond your Part A and Part B benefits, such as routine dental, vision, and hearing services, and even prescription drug coverage.
Senior supplements are supplemental health insurance plans designed specifically for senior’s needs. Supplemental health insurance includes products like dental, vision, and life insurance. These plans are sold by private health insurance companies and are not Medicare. They can be purchased at any time, though there are age restrictions to certain products (like life insurance).
^ Frakt, Austin (December 13, 2011). "Premium support proposal and critique: Objection 1, risk selection". The Incidental Economist. Retrieved October 20, 2013. [...] The concern is that these public health plans will find ways to attract relatively healthier and cheaper-to-cover beneficiaries (the "good" risks), leaving the sicker and more costly ones (the "bad" risks) in fee for service Medicare. Attracting good risks is known as "favorable selection" and attracting "bad" ones is "adverse selection." [...]
×