If you plan to travel a lot or simply want to choose doctors without concerns over only picking providers on an HMO or PPO network, you might compare Medigap plans. With a supplement, you will have to buy Medicare Part D to cover most prescription medications. This may cost somewhat more, but some folks prefer to choose their drug plan separately from the rest of their medical benefits.

^ Frakt, Austin (December 13, 2011). "Premium support proposal and critique: Objection 1, risk selection". The Incidental Economist. Retrieved October 20, 2013. [...] The concern is that these public health plans will find ways to attract relatively healthier and cheaper-to-cover beneficiaries (the "good" risks), leaving the sicker and more costly ones (the "bad" risks) in fee for service Medicare. Attracting good risks is known as "favorable selection" and attracting "bad" ones is "adverse selection." [...]

"Recovery is all about connection! I help people struggling with mental health and/or substance use issues to achieve positive change by learning to accept yourself and connect to others, starting with building a counseling relationship that affirms, encourages, and guides you through the process of growth and healing. My role is to help you find answers within yourself, build supportive connections, and learn effective coping skills, as you discover your true worth and potential. I will meet you where you are and offer feedback and compassion to help you reach your goals. "

To help protect your identity, Medicare has sent you a new Medicare card. Your new card will have a new Medicare Number that’s unique to you, instead of your Social Security Number. If you did not receive your new Medicare card, there may be something that needs to be corrected, like your mailing address. You can update your mailing address by logging in to or creating your personal my Social Security account.
When you apply for Medicare, you can sign up for Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medical Insurance). Because you must pay a premium for Part B coverage, you can turn it down. However, if you decide to enroll in Part B later on, you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage. Your monthly premium will go up 10 percent for each 12-month period you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t sign up for it, unless you qualify for a special enrollment period.

Special Needs Plans (SNP): Special Needs Plans are for beneficiaries with certain unique situations and meet certain eligibility criteria. These plans may limit membership to people who have certain chronic conditions, live in an institution (such as a nursing home), or are dual eligibles (receive both Medicare and Medicaid benefits). You must meet the eligibility requirements of the Special Needs Plan to enroll; for example, to enroll in a Dual-Eligible Special Needs Plan in your service area, you must have both Medicare and Medicaid coverage.
Since the mid-1990s, there have been a number of proposals to change Medicare from a publicly run social insurance program with a defined benefit, for which there is no limit to the government's expenses, into a publicly run health plan program that offers "premium support" for enrollees.[119][120] The basic concept behind the proposals is that the government would make a defined contribution, that is a premium support, to the health plan of a Medicare enrollee's choice. Sponsors would compete to provide Medicare benefits and this competition would set the level of fixed contribution. Additionally, enrollees would be able to purchase greater coverage by paying more in addition to the fixed government contribution. Conversely, enrollees could choose lower cost coverage and keep the difference between their coverage costs and the fixed government contribution.[121][122] The goal of premium Medicare plans is for greater cost-effectiveness; if such a proposal worked as planned, the financial incentive would be greatest for Medicare plans that offer the best care at the lowest cost.[119][122]
Now that you know more about Medicare Supplement plans, you may be wondering if one of these plans may be right for you. I always enjoy helping people figure this out. If you’d like to start out by getting some more information in front of you, use the links below, which let you schedule a phone appointment or have me email you information about plans. To take a look at all available Medicare plans right now, use the Compare Plans buttons on this page. To get to know me better, take a look at my photo and profile below (see my profile by clicking on the “View profile” link).
As long as you buy a Medigap plan during this six-month Medigap Open Enrollment Period, the insurance company cannot refuse to sell you a Medigap policy, charge you more because you have health problems, or make you wait for basic benefits to begin. However, you may have to wait up to six months for the Medigap policy’s benefits to include your pre-existing condition*. Original Medicare will generally still cover a pre-existing condition even if your Medicare Supplement insurance plan doesn’t pay for your out-of-pocket costs.
Yes. Some plans offer discounts if you’re married (studies show that married couples tend to be healthier – as they encourage each other to eat nutritious meals, exercise, and see a doctor). You can also possibly cut your rate if you’re a non-smoker, as you’ll likely have fewer health risks. Or you may be able to save by paying annually or via electronic funds transfer. Even if the website or brochure you’re studying doesn’t mention anything about discounts – ask.
We found policies that ranged in price from less than $100/month for basic coverage to thousands for maximum protection. There’s no “normal” number, as there are so many factors in play like where you live, your age and needs. A ballpark figure is a couple hundred dollars a month for standard coverage. However, it’s basic economics – the more supplemental insurance you want, the greater the cost.
*Pre-existing conditions are generally health conditions that existed before the start of a policy. They may limit coverage, be excluded from coverage, or even prevent you from being approved for a policy; however, the exact definition and relevant limitations or exclusions of coverage will vary with each plan, so check a specific plan’s official plan documents to understand how that plan handles pre-existing conditions. 

Medicare also has an important role driving changes in the entire health care system. Because Medicare pays for a huge share of health care in every region of the country, it has a great deal of power to set delivery and payment policies. For example, Medicare promoted the adaptation of prospective payments based on DRG's, which prevents unscrupulous providers from setting their own exorbitant prices.[80] Meanwhile, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has given Medicare the mandate to promote cost-containment throughout the health care system, for example, by promoting the creation of accountable care organizations or by replacing fee-for-service payments with bundled payments.[81]
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("PPACA") of 2010 made a number of changes to the Medicare program. Several provisions of the law were designed to reduce the cost of Medicare. The most substantial provisions slowed the growth rate of payments to hospitals and skilled nursing facilities under Parts A of Medicare, through a variety of methods (e.g., arbitrary percentage cuts, penalties for readmissions).

MedicareSupplement.com is owned and operated by TZ Insurance Solutions LLC. It serves as an invitation for you, the customer, to inquire about further information regarding Medicare Supplement Insurance. TZ Insurance Solutions LLC and the licensed insurance agents who may call you are not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. Government or the federal Medicare program. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed the information contained on MedicareSupplement.com.
The SGR was the subject of possible reform legislation again in 2014. On March 14, 2014, the United States House of Representatives passed the SGR Repeal and Medicare Provider Payment Modernization Act of 2014 (H.R. 4015; 113th Congress), a bill that would have replaced the (SGR) formula with new systems for establishing those payment rates.[59] However, the bill would pay for these changes by delaying the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate requirement, a proposal that was very unpopular with Democrats.[60] The SGR was expected to cause Medicare reimbursement cuts of 24 percent on April 1, 2014, if a solution to reform or delay the SGR was not found.[61] This led to another bill, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (H.R. 4302; 113th Congress), which would delay those cuts until March 2015.[61] This bill was also controversial. The American Medical Association and other medical groups opposed it, asking Congress to provide a permanent solution instead of just another delay.[62]

A federal law passed in 2003 created a “competition” requirement for Medicare Cost plans, which stipulated the plans could not be offered in service areas where there was significant competition from Medicare Advantage plans. Congress delayed implementation of the requirement several times until a law passed in 2015 that called for the rule to take effect in 2019.

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